Author Archive for Ce Eshelman

The Little Things

Dear Parents,

Yesterday, my son–now 22 years old and living nearby in a supportive housing program for people with mental health issues–texted me this: “Mom can I git dentst?” 

I texted back, “Yes, call the dentist office on the corner near your house.” 

He responded, “K, wel, I thnking I go out for a walkng and jus goin, cus  I not good calling.”  

“Sounds good, here is your insurance ID # in case you need it.”

“K thky, by, lov ya,” he signs off.

Now this exchange may sound really disturbing to you, but to me it is lovely and I am so proud of him.  This is progress for a young man who has functioned at about half his age nearly his whole life due to extreme abuse, neglect, and abandonment before he was two years old. 

That abuse is impacting his entire life.  He went to a public school for only 1.5 years before he had to be placed in residential care for safety reasons– he stabbed his 1st grade teacher with a sharp pencil and later came at me with a very big butcher knife. He simulated raping his older sister every time he saw her.  He was a scary, pint-sized 6-year-old.

My son always attended a special day school.  He never worked at grade level, and he never went to a friend’s birthday party. He never attended a school dance, football game, or class trip to anywhere.  He didn’t graduate or even get a certificate for High School despite attending until he was 20 years old.  He lives on social security now, and will likely never work for a paycheck. 

Turns out he is very happy and pleased with himself for living on his own with just a little support.  He cooks for his housemates once a week, again with a little help with measuring from an older resident.  He is known as one of the smartest guys in his house because he can help everyone a little with their technology woes. Did I mention this? He is happy.

His text is evidence of prefrontal cortex development.  First, he recognizes he needs a dentist.  Secondly, he reached out for help and accepted my suggestion (a big deal) that he can handle it himself (also a big deal). Lastly, he understands his limitation with phone calls and finds an alternative solution instead of giving up (eventually being in great pain and maybe losing a tooth).  The cherry on top–he signs off with love to me (finally feeling connected to his mother which is a super big deal to both of us).

Watching him notice that the pain in his mouth is a toothache, ask for help, have insight about his limitations, and take initiative to find solutions–priceless.

Never give up parents.  Hope springs eternal.  No matter how deep your own sadness or disappointment about your child’s journey, your child will eventually unfold his/her own personal potential.  What else is there? 

Love matters,

Ce

NOTE: If you are planning to attend The Attach Place Therapeutic Parenting Class on February 2nd, 2019 from (10am to 4pm, be sure to sign up or drop an email (info@attachplace.com) to let us know you are planning to attend.  Or register here.  CALVCB accepted.

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held February 2nd, 2019 from 10 am to 4 pm.  Childcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public.  NEW DAY: Monday from 5:30 to 7pm.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group, February  13th, 2019.  Childcare provided at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE A BOOK OF SUPPORT TO A FELLOW PARENT ON THE ADOPTION JOURNEY: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  Buy from Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

 

 

 

 

 

Attention Is A Need

I work with a number of children who annoy for attention. Attention is attention to them regardless of whether it is positive or negative.  Some attachment challenged children have difficulty being vulnerable enough to seek attention in a pro-social way.  To do that would be to admit that s/he has emotional needs in the first place. And some are simply habituated to seeking negative attention.

My son has mastered the art of ridiculous questioning to get my attention. For example, “Mom, I’m wondering why it is that I really like to go to those swim parks? Why do you think I like them so much?”

Out of the blue from another child, “One time when I was visiting my grandmother’s farm the dog farted so loud the cats ran into the barn.”

Another child asks, “Can you see air?”

And another, “I noticed cats have big eyes.”

My son, “Mom, I didn’t know you were home.  Are you home now?”  

Again, my son, “Mom, why do I like cauliflower that way and not the other way? And, “The worst thing to call a teacher is Mrs. P.”

Really?

Instead of giving the “go away from me” look of annoyance or the ridicule that might easily roll off your tongue (like it wants to from mine), pull your child (big or small) in for a hug or a close-up of soft eyes with a “love bomb” smile.  This is all that is needed:  I love you–now run along, Sweetheart.  Anytime you want my attention, come ask for a hug.

Attention is a need. Nothing else. Resist the urge to be sarcastic, mean, ridiculing, or angry.  Honestly, our children need our attention.  Give it to them more when they need it, and the non-sensical crazy stuff will decrease.

Love matters,

Ce

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held February 2nd, 2019 from 10 am to 4 pm.  Childcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public.  NEW DAY: Monday from 5:30 to 7pm.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group, January 9th, 2019.  Childcare provided at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE A BOOK OF SUPPORT TO A FELLOW PARENT ON THE ADOPTION JOURNEY: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  Buy from Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

Tis The Season

Dear Parents,

There seems to be very little predictable about the holiday season except how unpredictable they are when you are parenting a child who has trouble managing emotions.  The remedy is to keep your solid routines of everyday life and just say “no” to too much–too much fudge, too much out-of-town family, too much travel, too much stuff, and even too much fun.  Okay, it isn’t that easy to pull off, but it is well worth trying. 

I have a vivid memory of forewarning my extended family before bringing my easily dysregulated children to their first out-of-town Christmas with all my siblings.  Everyone was excited to meet their new little family members and my little ones were beside themselves to get to go on a long trip to meet these extravagant strangers at the end. 

The car trip itself was unbelievable. I really wasn’t prepared.  We stopped to pee every hour and ate more McDonald’s on that first leg than we had eaten all together from adoption to that date.  By the time we arrived, I had a migraine and needed a nap.  When I woke up, my sisters had indulged my children with chocolate everything.  No kidding.  They were amped so high I was awakened by the walls vibrating. By the end of the day, both kids were screaming they hated me; they wanted to live with their chocolate pusher Auntie; and ultimately every person in the house was standing with their mouths agape and looking like deer in headlights.  Fun times. 

It wasn’t my kids’ fault.  They genuinely could not regulate their emotions and other people did not know (no matter how much I tried to tell them) they could not indulge every whim of children who have weak attachments and only a limp grip on self-control. Every Christmas thereafter I took a minimalist approach.  We still had our wild moments, but nothing like that one where the wheels came completely off the car.

To that end, I am wishing you a very regulated, predictable, low-ley, minimalist and, therefore, delightful holiday wherever you are, wherever you go, wherever you find yourself.

Love matters,

Ce

Time for Hindsight

Dear Parent,
The Attach Place

The Attach Place
Center for Strengthening Relationships

This morning I found myself thinking about how hard I tried to get both of my children to fit into “normal.”  I wanted them to want the things for their lives I wanted for them. That’s telling, isn’t it? I eventually let go of these wants, or maybe I was forced by the reality of my children’s lives to accept them on their terms.  It took me a while to see that I needed to advocate with “normal” systems for my children, rather than insisting my children contort themselves into what was expected.  I imagine a cartoon line-drawing of giant, puffy-pillow children being stuffed into tiny little boxes by a harried woman with her hair on fire.  The caption reads The Good Mother. Frankly, my children couldn’t do all that was expected.  They didn’t want for themselves what I wanted for them because they were busy surviving each day, while I had the luxury of “felt safety” and the ability to imagine fearfully toward their futures. Of course, like all parents, I needed to think about the future for them when they couldn’t for themselves, but that sometimes blinded me in the moment and I lost sight of what was most important—creating a safe, regulated family life for them in which to heal. In the beginning I forced them, by hook or by crook (No idea what that really means, but you get the picture, right?), into regular school hours, traditional classroom settings, curricula focused on higher test scores, behaving well, obeying well, playing well, and, all in all, engaging the world well–emphasis on well. That was a lot to ask, too much to ask, from my children who were robbed of personal boundaries, sacred birthrights, attachment security, and fundamental felt safety in their first two years of life. These are the musings of a mother with grown children who has the delicious abundance of time to look back and think about what she might have done differently to ease the fear, suffering, and disturbance of the early years of her children in their unfamiliar, new home.  I’m sharing this with you in the hope your children might benefit from the missteps, mishaps, mistakes, and musings of this parent who previously traversed the tumultuous terrain now set out before you. Love matters, Ce

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held in January 12th 2019, from 10 am to 4 pm.  Childcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public.  Look for new day and time in January TBD next year.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group on December 12, 2018! Open to all parents/caregivers at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE A BOOK OF SUPPORT TO A FELLOW PARENT ON THE ADOPTION JOURNEY: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  Buy from Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

The Holidays Can Be Lovely With Children From Difficult Beginnings

Dear Parents,

The Attach Place

The Attach Place
Center for Strengthening Relationships

I just met up with my adult children for a pre-Thanksgiving gathering. I found myself marveling at how they are unfolding.  I mean that.  At 21 and 23, they are adults with lives of their own.  They are happy.  They have interests and friends and places to go and things to do.  They are grown up and I no longer worry about them. And that is the point of this post.

I worried way too much when my children were growing up.  Because they came from difficult beginnings and because their behavior was out of the ordinary, I fretted and worried and over controlled them.  I downright ruined every holiday.  Yes, it was me who ruined them, though at the time I quietly thought it was them ruining it for us.  I was wrong.

What I didn’t know how to do then was accept my children as they were.  I wanted them to be the way I wanted them.  You know, a lot more perfect.  Way less messy.  Seriously better mannered.  Definitely well regulated. I didn’t want their trauma to be impacting my holidays–pure and simple. Every year, every holiday I didn’ want that.  And, every year, every holiday they were who they were–traumatized, attachment reactive children from difficult beginnings.  Who needed to change in this situation?  Who had the most potential for change at the time?  Yep, it was me.

I could have accepted my life and my children. I could have changed my expectations and made the environment trauma-sensitive.  I could have been considerate of what they could tolerate and how long they could tolerate it.  Instead, I tried to fit them into my life the way it was before children and the way I thought other children were able to fit in.  My children weren’t other children; they were actually special with special needs during the holidays.  I could have been more loving and less worried about how they behaved. I could have been more flexible.

I learned a lot about myself while raising my children.  Much of what I learned was not pretty or pleasing to me.  Frankly, I wasn’t personally prepared for traumatized children.  I had to learn to be.  I had to learn to let them be.  I wish I knew then what I know now.

My children are unfolding in their adult lives according to their abilities.  That was always their trajectory.  My advice to my former self (who might resemble your current self): worry less, accept more.  I think that is the definition of love.

Happy Thanksgiving,

Ce

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held in January 2019, from 10 am to 4 pm.  Childcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public.  Look for new day in January TBD next year.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group on December 12, 2018! Open to all parents/caregivers at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE A BOOK OF SUPPORT TO A FELLOW PARENT ON THE ADOPTION JOURNEY: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  Buy from Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

Fix Less, Accept More

Dear Parents,

The Attach Place

The Attach Place
Center for Strengthening Relationships

What follows is not criticism.  It is a chance to acknowledge to yourself, “I got this,” or to see you have some growing to do as a parent of children from difficult beginnings.  Personally, I am always the latter, despite all I know.  Here goes.

Have you ever been in a relationship where you spent a lot of time trying to get the other person to change?

If you would learn to share your feelings…

If you would try to think about me once in a while…

If you were more motivated to grow…

If you were more considerate…

If you liked my family…

If you would go out more…

If you were more adventurous…

If you were more spontaneous…

If you were more reliable…

If you were more positive…

If you weren’t so negative…

If you weren’t so judgmental…

If you would care more about how you look…

If you would care less about what others think…

If you liked to hang out with my friends…

If you had more friends…

If you helped around the house more…

If you didn’t have so many big feelings all the time…

If you would just be happy…

If you weren’t so miserable…

If you worked less…

If you worked more…

If I felt more loved…

Then…what?  I would feel better. I would accept you. I would love you.

That relationship didn’t work out very well, did it?  Or, that relationship isn’t going very well now, is it?

For a moment, think about your relationship with your attachment challenged, traumatized child. Do you have an “If…then” list?

If you would just be normal…

If you would act your age…

If you could stop bouncing off the walls…

If you could stop talking all the time…

If you would just tell me what you feel…

If you would clean your room…

If you would tell the truth…

If you were trustworthy…

If you were honest…

If you were less self-centered…

If you would think about the rest of the family…

If you would take less and give more…

If you would do your homework…

If you would try harder…

If you were pleasant to be around…

If you brushed your teeth, showered, zipped…

If you would stop badgering me…

If you would act right…

If you would do the right thing…

If you weren’t always making me crazy…

If you would stop scaring me…

If you didn’t need so much supervision…

If you weren’t so needy…

If you weren’t so helpless…

If you would just grow up…

If you would show some love…

If you would stop controlling…

If you would stop throwing tantrums…

If you would accept some love…

If you would trust me…

If you would get better…

Then…what?  I would feel better. I would accept you. I would love you.

Enough said, right?

I am always fighting my own “If…then” stink’in think’in.  It keeps me from being present, from accepting, from being a loving person.  Love is free, not an “if-then” proposition. I am a work in progress. How about you? Steady on.

Love matters,

Ce

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held in January 2019, from 10 am to 4 pm.  Childcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register here or on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public. November 19, 2018from 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group on November 14, 2018! Open to all parents/caregivers at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE A BOOK OF SUPPORT TO A FELLOW PARENT ON THE ADOPTION JOURNEY: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  Buy from Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

 

Neurofeedback Solutions for reducing the intensity of Developmental Trauma symptoms in foster and adoptive children and their parents.  Get more information here.

Change Your Child’s Brain / Change Your Child’s Life

 

 

Time Sensitive: Free OnLine ATN Parenting Summit Starts Nov. 8

Dear Parents,

Register today because this free online parenting summit starts tomorrow, Nov. 8th, 2018.

Attachment and Trauma Network is gearing up to air their Trauma-Sensitive Parenting Summit interviews, Nov 8-14.  The interviews will each be live for 24 hours (actually 28+ hours with time zone changes – the link is usually up by midnight eastern and stays up until we take it down early the following morning…).  On each daily summit page there will be links to be able to view the interview as a video, listen to it as an audio file or read the transcript.  People who have registered to attend the free summit will receive a daily email with a link to this page(This is the only way they get the link!) Please encourage those in your sphere of influence to register at  www.attachmenttraumanetwork.org/summit

The airing schedule is as follows:

Thurs, Nov 8

●       Keynote:  Integration & Awareness

Dr. Daniel J. Siegel

Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCLA’s School of Medicine

Los Angeles, CA

Interviewer:  TIffany Sudela-Junker

●       ATN Roundtable Discussion:  What is Trauma-Sensitive Parenting?

Four of ATN’s Trauma-Sensitive, Therapeutic Parenting Leaders:

o   Tiffany Sudela-Junker

o   Lorraine Schneider

o   Stephanie Garde, JD

o   Julie Beem, MBA

 

Fri, Nov 9

●       Supporting & Educating Therapeutic Parents in the UK and around the World

Sarah Naish

CEO of National Association of Therapeutic Parents and Manager Director of Inspire Training Group, United Kingdom

Interviewer:  Julie Beem

●       Parenting a Child with a History of Trauma

Ce Eshleman, LMFT

Founder of The Attach Place, Sacramento, CA

Interviewer:  Stephanie Garde

●       What Trauma Does to Our Children’s Brains

Julie Beem, MBA

Executive Director of Attachment & Trauma Network (ATN)

Marietta, GA

Interviewer:  Stephanie Garde

Sat, Nov 10

●       The Legacy of Attachment:  Understanding How My Own History Impacts My Parenting

Karen Buckwalter, LCSW

Director of Program Strategy, Chaddock, Quincy, IL

Interviewer:  Julie Beem

●       Self-Regulation and the Traumatized Child

Allison Cooke Douglas

Therapeutic Parent and Education & Training Coordinator of Harmony Family Center’s ASAP Program, Knoxville, TN

Interviewer:  Lorraine Schneider

●       Shame and Early Trauma

Tiffany Sudela-Junker

Whole-Hearted, Whole Brain Parent, XParenting

Seattle, WA

Interviewer:  Lorraine Schneider

Sun, Nov 11

●       From Chaos to Calm

Jules Alvarado

Healing Expert & Peace Consultant and President & Senior Clinical Consultant of Alvarado Consulting & Treatment Group, Boulder, CO

Interviewer:  Julie Beem

●       Trauma-Informed Parenting When You Have Your Own Trauma History

Cissy White

Parent, Author and Speaker

ACEs Connection & Founder of Heal Write Now

Massachusetts

Interviewer:  Stephanie Garde

●       Community of Support

Anna Paravano, MS, CID

Therapeutic Parent, Educator and Former ATN Parenting Director

Interviewer: Tiffany Sudela-Junker

Mon, Nov 12

●       Parenting Children with Challenging Behaviors

Ross Greene, Ph.D.

Originator of CPS Model, author and Founding Director of Lives in the Balance

Maine

Interviewer:  Julie Beem

●       Healing Through Stories:  Using Narratives

Jane Samuel, JD

Grad Student in Family Sciences, University of Kentucky

Lexington, KY

Interviewer: Stephanie Garde

Tues, Nov 13

●       An In-Home Approach

Billy Kaplan, LCSW

President & Clinical Director of Housecalls Counseling, Willamette, IL

Interviewer:  Tiffany Sudela-Junker

●       The Grief of Letting Go

Carrie O’Toole

Board Certified Life Coach & Attachment-Based Intervention Specialist

Carrie O’Toole Ministries, Colorado

Interviewer:  Tiffany Sudela-Junker

Wed, Nov 14

●       The Art of Becoming a Connected Parent

Mark Vatsaas

Connected Parent & Parenting Coach, Founder of Seen and Heard Coaching, Colorado

Interviewer: Julie Beem

●       Therapeutic Parenting:  The ATN Difference

Stephanie Garde, JD

Operations Manager of Attachment & Trauma Network (ATN)

Fairhaven, MA

Interviewer: Lorraine Schneider

●       Trauma, Teens & Tech

Christine Moers

Therapeutic Parent and Parenting Coach

Texas

Interviewer:  Tiffany Sudela-Junker


People wanting to order (purchase) the summit, can do this at our store  ( I will send you that link as well, once we have it operational).  The cost for ATN members is only $29.99 and everyone else $69.99.  If the buyer wants the videos/audios/transcripts mailed on a flash drive it’s an additional $15 – otherwise, they will be sent an access link to download the videos/audios/transcripts.  Download orders will be filled by December 1; flash drive orders will follow.  (You will receive your video/transcript for your own use once the summit is over, as well.)
We have over 2,000 people registered and are swamped with new sign-ups today.

REGISTER TODAY!

Love Matters,

Ce

Sleep Is Key for Parents and Children from Difficult Beginnings

The Attach Place

The Attach Place
Center for Strengthening Relationships

Dear Parents,

I know you are well aware that your sleep and your child’s sleep are super important to a happy home. Do you know why?  And, do you know how to set the stage for getting the best sleep?  If you know, don’t read on.  If you are curious, here are the basic facts and a few tips for getting the most out of slumber.

THE WHY

There are 5 Sleep Stages:

  1.  Stage one is that delicious, half awake time when one is easily awakened, and moving in and out of sleep. Eye and muscle activity slows and some people experience sudden contractions followed by a feeling of falling.
  2. Stage two prepares the body for deep sleep by dropping body temperature and bringing eye movement to stillness.  There only a few spurts of rapid brain waves and the heart rate slows.
  3. Stage three takes you deep into sleep where slow delta brain waves are active with short bouts of faster brain waves.  During this stage, the body repairs and regrows tissues, builds bone and muscle, and strengthens the immune system. This is also the time of parasomnias–night terrors, sleepwalking and talking, and bedwetting.
  4. Stage four gets a person into deep sleep where the brain is producing exclusively slow delta waves. If roused from this state, people feel disoriented and have a difficult time placing where they are.
  5. Stage five is called REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep when brain waves most resemble the brain waves active during waking periods.  The first REM cycle begins after about 90 minutes of sleep and lasts for 10 minutes or so. REM cycles repeat several times throughout the night with the longest lasting for about an hour. This is where the emotions and events of the day are sorted out through dreams that likely will not be remembered.  Fun fact: Babies spend about 50% of their sleep in REM, while adults do only 20%.

Full sleep cycles occur about  4 or 5 times during a night.  If REM gets interrupted for any reason, the body will try to get more the next night to make up for it.

THE HOW

TIPS for Sleep:

Ce’s Soap Box: Turn all screens off 2 hours before bedtime.  Yep, phones, iPads, iPods, TVs, computers, laptops–OFF!  Create a calm home an hour before bedtime and everyone will fall asleep sooner and stay asleep longer.  Actually, reduce screentime overall for a healthier lifestyle.

CONTROL LIGHT AND KEEP A ROUTINE

  1. Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day.
  2. Avoid sleeping in—even on weekends.
  3. Be smart about napping.
  4. Fight after-dinner drowsiness. …
  5. Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning.
  6. Spend more time outside during daylight.
  7. Don’t read books on a backlit device.
  8. Use full spectrum light if you are indoors all day, every day.
  9. Sleep in a dark room.
  10. Keep light low when you go to the bathroom in the night.

YOU ARE WHAT YOU CONSUME

Foods that encourage sleep are Tryptophan-rich. Dairy, nuts, seeds, bananas, honey, and eggs. A small amount of good carbs before bed will help one fall asleep faster:  bowl of low sugar cereal with milk, half a turkey sandwich, bread and cheese, or nuts and crackers.

Eat only a small snack before bed because a big meal will disrupt your sleep by activating your digestive system and lead to nighttime trips to the bathroom.

Cut all sources of caffeine from the diet 4 to 6 hours before bedtime.  Beware of small traces of caffeine in chocolate, tea, decaf coffee. Read the label on all over-the-counter medications for pain, allergies, and colds, because they may have hidden caffeine.

Don’t drink alcohol 4 to 6 hours before sleep.  Alcohol can cause what I call the “bolt uprights” when your blood sugar drops and you are awakened from it.

Avoid tyrosine-rich foods at bedtime.  Protein activates brain activity.  And, of course, sugar is not a good idea at bedtime for challenged children and challenged adults, but really should be kept to a bare minimum for everyone all the time.

Staying hydrated during the day is important, but drinking fluids a couple of hours before bed will cause the need for urination throughout the night.

Smoking is a stimulant.  Skip the urge to relax this way before bed.  Actually, any time.  Try yoga instead.

MOVE

Exercise during the day (at least 3 hours before bedtime) is essential for restful sleep at night; however, exercise before bed is too stimulating.

Vigorous exercise is best, and even 10 minutes of walking per day will improve your sleep. Build a daily exercise routine because it takes some time before you see the full benefits of exercise on sleep hygiene.

TOOLBOX

Create a “toolbox” of relaxing bedtime rituals to help you unwind before sleep.

  • Read a book or magazine by a soft light
  • Take a warm bath
  • Listen to soft music
  • Do some easy stretches
  • Wind down with a favorite hobby
  • Listen to an audiobook
  • Make simple preparations for the next day and then LET IT GO
  • Dim the lights in the hours leading up to bed
  • Quiet your home and your mind
  • Meditate for a few minutes–Loving Kindness Meditation
  • Talk to your doc about the use of over the counter Melatonin to induce sleep

GET OFF THE HAMPSTER WHEEL

Whatever you are worried about will be better after a good night’s sleep, so give up thinking about stuff until you are fresh in the morning.  You will be surprised how quickly solutions come following sleep.

If you don’t believe me, check this out.

Love and sleep matter,

Ce

 

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held on November 10, 2018, from 10 am to 4 pmChildcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register here or on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public. November 19, 2018from 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group on November 14, 2018! Open to all parents/caregivers at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE MY BOOK FOR SUPPORT TO A FELLOW ADOPTION ADVENTURER: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  At Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

 

Neurofeedback Solutions for reducing the intensity of Developmental Trauma symptoms in foster and adoptive children and their parents.  Get more information here.

Change Your Child’s Brain / Change Your Child’s Life

 

 

The Imagination Is Worse Than Reality With Traumatized Children

Dear Parents,

The Attach Place

The Attach Place
Center for Strengthening Relationships

As a fellow parent, I know what it is like to be scared senseless by TV movies about attachment challenged children, about News reports of foster children killing parents, and my imagination in the face of truly unbelievable, unrelenting shenanigans by my children. Much of my own dysregulation was caused by my ever-present fear of the future hovering around me. Sometimes I could feel the breath of fear, rank and hot on my neck.

Do yourself a favor:  only think of your children in the present. They are not your future nightmare.  They are children. They are traumatized, wounded children.

Difficult?  Oh yes.  Hurting and hurtful?  Certainly.  Criminals and killers?  Not usually.  Can they become criminals and killers?  Yes, just like the rest of the population. News flash: most criminals and killers are raised by their biological parents.

Put your fears away and bring your empathy, tenacity, and love out for the rest of their childhood.  Don’t let the sensational, unusual, or imaginal destroy your ability to love freely with hope now. Remember that attachment challenged brains are delayed emotionally.  Even if you have a terrible teen, calculate the true emotional age (about half the chronological age). Still pretty darned young, right?

Love matters,

Ce

The Attach Place Upcoming Events Calendar

Trust-based Therapeutic Parenting Class for Parents of Children from Difficult Beginnings by Ce Eshelman, LMFT will be held on November 10, 2018, from 10 am to 4 pmChildcare provided for an additional fee. CALVCB will reimburse this training. Register here or on our website!

AUTISM Support Group:  Monthly Strictly Social Autism Spectrum Disorder Night for Tweens (11 yrs – 16 yrs) at The Attach Place. Open to the public. November 19, 2018from 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm.  Gluten-free snacks provided. Please RSVP to Andrea@attachplace.com so we get enough snacks. This is a  monthly social group for the children; and caregivers will have an opportunity to connect, chat, and chill in a separate space. A donation of $0.00 to $5.00 will be accepted for food and supervision if you are able, but please don’t let that be an attendance barrier because the group is FREE.  ASD kids need a social life and this is a great way to make it happen.

UPCOMING ADOPTION SUPPORT GROUP facilitated by Ce Eshelman, LMFT:  Click Here to join our monthly  Adoptive/Foster Parent Support Group on November 14, 2018! Open to all parents/caregivers at no cost. Support Group is every 2nd Wednesday of every month from 6 pm to 8 pm at 3336 Bradshaw Road, Ste 175, Sacramento, CA 95827.

GIVE MY BOOK FOR SUPPORT TO A FELLOW ADOPTION ADVENTURER: Drowning With My Hair On Fire: Insanity Relief For Adoptive Parents by Ce Eshelman, LMFT.  Daily inspirational reading for those who sometimes find it hard to keep hope alive. There is hope for healing.  At Amazon or get a discounted copy here.

 

Neurofeedback Solutions for reducing the intensity of Developmental Trauma symptoms in foster and adoptive children and their parents.  Get more information here.

Change Your Child’s Brain / Change Your Child’s Life

 

 

Free This Weekend Only: Better Sleep for Anxious Children

Dear Parents,

This weekend only Renee Jain, creator of GoZen (which I really enjoy, too), is giving a free gift  to anyone who wants to listen to 18 Sleep Experts share about improving sleep for children who have trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, waking in fear, and/or sleeping with you way past the toddler years.

Here is the link.  If your child has trouble sleeping, take the time to consume some help for it.

Listen to 18 Sleep Experts             https://talks.bettersleepforkids.com/encore

Enjoy.

Love matters,

Ce